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Death Note: All Humans Go to Mu, Nothingness

Journal Entry: Thu Oct 30, 2008, 6:35 AM


After one of my recent stories, involving Mello and Matt's afterlife, Spoiled-kitten and I started a conversation around Death Note's canon theology.  What does Ohba say happens after death?   There are several clues to it, particularly in conversations between Raito and Ryuk, so there is something to go on.

This bit of dialogue provides the most insight:

Ryuk:  Don't think that any human who's used the Death Note can go to Heaven or Hell.  You'll find out about that after you die.
Raito:  Can't go to Heaven or Hell.  That's told me everything, Ryuk.
Ryuk:  Huh? What?
Raito: It just means that there is no Heaven or Hell.  Right?
Ryuk:  ! ... You really are something.  I thought all humans seriously believed in Heaven and Hell, but... you are absolutely right.  There is no Heaven and Hell.  No matter what you do while you're alive, everybody goes to the same place once you die.  Death is equal.

Then you get the rules in the Death Note:

*  The human who uses this book can neither go to Heaven or Hell.
*  All humans will, without exception, eventually die.  After they die, the place they go is Mu (nothingness).

Spoiled-kitten wrote, I actually thought that that the meaning under the "nor Heaven or Hell" thing was just that it pushed Raito to do what he did: since there's nothing at all after this life, and nobody will punish you for being evil, he decided that those who deserve it must be punished during this life.

Your interpretation works really well.  I also think that it's how it would be read by any Christian or anyone within a Christian country, which is pretty much the entire Western world.  That could well be deliberate and is probably the right answer!

My interpretation though is going to come from my own Wiccan bias.  It might be crack, I don't know, but here it is.

My initial thought is that Death Note was originally written for a Japanese audience.  They'd need a Near level of precognition in order to realise how big it was going to be elsewhere.  I've spotted things in the past that send out blatant messages to Japanese readers, that are diluted or missed entirely by the rest of the world, so I want to know what 'Mu', 'nothingness', 'Heaven' and 'Hell' mean to a Japanese mind.  Unfortunately, I'm not Japanese, never been there, barely touched the culture until Death Note, so I'm a bit buggered.

Google ftw!

Before I go there though, I'd like to state that it's my belief that Ohba is a Zen Buddhist.   My thinking here is thus:

*  Buddhism is one of the two major religions in Japan
*  Mu (and Nothingness) is a Zen Buddhist term
*  L meditates in a Buddhist pose early on in the Manga (implication is that L = Buddhist; interviews in DN13, plus the author profile, aligns Ohba with L (see how he sits on a chair), so wild leap of faith deduction Ohba = Buddhist.)

I've just been reading things about Zen Buddhism and, in that context, the dialogue between Raito and Ryuk can also sound like evangelism!  LOL  

I also looked up 'shinigami' to see where that fitted in with the Japanese religious world.  It doesn't.  It's a Western import, from Germany via Italy, that exists only in Japanese fiction. It's a translation of 'Grim Reaper' and doesn't have a correlation in any Japanese deity from any religion common there.

I did find something interesting though. There is a minor religion in Japan called Ryukyuan.  I couldn't find any death gods there; but that religion does allow for deities, spirits and other supernatural beings.  Could the name Ryuk have stemmed from this?

Back to the plot.  What is Mu?  I did find some links between Mu and the Chinese Meifu (land of the dead), however, the more I dug into that, the more apparent it became that Meifu was also a Western import.  It appears to turn up, alongside shinigamis, in a host of other manga.  Meifu is the home of the shinigamis in several stories.  I find it hard not to believe that Ohba was aware of this, considering that this is his field.  A big example is "Yami no Matsuei", where the shinigamis live in Meifu and resemble the spirits of Ryukyuan religion.  There are 12 of them, plus a king.  I also spotted a major character called Shidou, though he's human. :p  The shinigami in this story act more as guardians than destroyers.

I then looked for links about the concept of the Death Note itself in Japanese religion.  All I found was this: comipress.com/article/2007/01/… to do with religion at all, just a strong argument that Ohba nicked the idea from another author.  

So what have we got?  I'd argue that the Japanese mind, reading Death Note, would have been familiar with shinigamis alreadys, from the millions of other manga referencing them.  However, it would be understood that they are nothing to do with 'real life' and therefore the Japanese reader would be looking to see what the aspect is in this story.  Are these shinigamis protectors, mischevious, guardians of something specific, what?  The traditional or default view is that the shinigami will come to take the souls of humans to Meifu.  

Ohba sets out the supernatural world of Death Note in the first chapter.  The short version is that it dips into the fictional afterlife culture prevalent in manga, then spins it off into Zen Buddhism.  That's my take anyway.

The first words on the page are 'The Realm of the Shinigami', which would be assumed to be Meifu.  One of the first things that Raito asks Ryuk is if he's come to take his soul. Ohba then sets out his version of shinigamis and the afterlife.  Raito is led into asking, 'so there really is no penalty to pay for using the Death Note', which prompts Ryuk to answer, 'Ryuk:  Don't think that any human who's used the Death Note can go to Heaven or Hell.  You'll find out about that after you die.'  We don't get Raito's deductions, that immediately followed, until the end of the manga.

In chapter three, we are introduced to L.  He's already been built up as very, very clever, and our glimpses of him show a room stripped of all unnecessary clutter.  In case we missed the Zen Buddhist hint there, chapter four opens with him meditating in a Zen Buddhist pose.  So the great genius of Death Note is a Zen Buddhist.  Got it.  Meanwhile, the great baddie of the story, Raito, waffles on a lot about templates of good and evil, while quoting Paradise Lost and refering to God.  All of these things are Western imports.  Zen Buddhism doesn't need a template of good and evil, because everything just is.  Even Raito, it is revealed at the end, is far too clever to blindly believe in concepts of Heaven and Hell.  He deduces immediately, from Ryuk's words, that such things don't exist.  Yep, a Buddhist view of the universe.

Finally, we get Ohba's final spin on manga pop-religion, which is to transform the expected Meifu into the Buddhist Mu.  To emphasise the point, we also get (nothingness) tagged onto it; a definition which would be necessary, because it's implied that Mu is a place in the statement that 'all humans go to Mu'.  Mu isn't a place, it's a concept.

Mu (Japanese/Korean), and Wu (Chinese traditional: 無, simplified: 无 pinyin: wú Jyutping: mou2} is a word which has been roughly translated as "none", "without", or "not-being". While typically used as a prefix to imply the absence of something (e.g., 無線 musen for "wireless"), it is more famously used as a response to certain koans and other questions in Zen Buddhism, intending to indicate that the question itself was wrong.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W%C3%BA

Think of nothingness, and it becomes something. The word "nothingness" is a wrapped package containing our own interpretation of what nothingness should be. True nothingness
can never be fathomed. True nothingness exists in the instant before we think about it. Nothingness.

japanhouse.art.uiuc.edu/oldsit…

From the Zen standpoint since nothing can be definitively settled on this argument it becomes a futile cause...  Zen doesn't talk about the idea of an afterlife for many reasons.  For one, it begs the question who was it that was born and it going to die or reincarnates?  How can we talk about an after life when we don't know who we are that is born?  Any idea we have about this is a premise based on knowing who or what we are and we don't know that. Who were you before your birth?  We can hold any viewpoint we want but that does not make it a reality.
en.allexperts.com/q/Buddhists-…

So, what is God?  Mu.   Is there an afterlife?  Mu.  What would have happened to Mello and Matt if they'd survived?  (hides my stories)  Mu.  It's unknowable and therefore futile trying to speculate.  We should live our lives for now, not some future that may or may not exist; may or may not be even able to be comprehended by us in our human world.  It's not so much the void of Christian genesis, but something that is meaningless.  In other words, stop asking the question!

The interviewer in DN13 asks Ohba if there was a theme he wished to express during the series.  He replied, Not really.  If I had to choose something, I'd say, "Humans will all eventually die and never come back to life, so let's give it our all while we're alive."  

Not really?  Eh? :iconobjectionplz:  I think not!

At the beginning of the same interview, Ohba is asked if the story progressed as initially planned.  He said that he wanted it to end in the Yellow Box, but that was it for actual plotlines.  Then goes on to say, One thing that I didn't allow to be changed was the notion that "when you die, you become nothingness."  Luckily, I was able to keep this part...  In other words, the one thing that he was adamant about was Mu.  

For a third time the issue comes up, in the middle of the same interview.   The interviewer asks about what's behind the concept of Mu, in Death Note.  Ohba states, For me, one of the premises of the series was that once a person died, they could never come back to life.  I really wanted to set a rule that bringing characters back to life is cheating.  That's why death equals "nothingness".

In short, we'd never see L returning, like Banquo's ghost, to accuse Raito of being Kira.

Then a final, FOURTH mention came with the question about why "nothingness" was written on the corners of the black spread, when the chapter appeared in Weekly Jump.  It turned out that editors are normally responsible for that sort of thing, but on this occasion, Ohba himself ensured that it was written there.

The interview then goes on to state that Ohba did not want to be in a position of debating good and evil within Death Note. It was meant to be pure entertainment, for a younger audience.  Once you start including a template for good and evil, ie a Western concept of the afterlife, represented here by Heaven and Hell, then you have to explore such issues.  

So there's the crux of it:  

* The shinigami had to exist, because otherwise Raito would have no-one to discuss this with and the story couldn't progress.   

* Ordinarily, the whole point of a shinigami is to convey souls to an otherworld.  Ohba didn't want there to be a stated otherworld, as that implied templates of good and evil, and that was too deep for the story (and target audience) here.

* An alternative view to the otherworld is also the most common view in real Japanese religious thought:  it's unknowable, therefore stop harping on about it.

* The introduction of Mu allowed for three things:  an explanation as to why, in the decidedly supernatural world of Death Note (see shinigamis, the note itself, tarot cards etc), we never see a ghost.  (Except in the anime.  Obha doesn't mention how that one got through.  Secondly, while side-stepping theological debates, it also allowed for a global appreciation of Death Note.  (Anything that is unknowable immediately implies that it will be speculated about and therefore become something.  The Buddhists can scream at us all they like that we've missed the point, but for me Mu = Annwn.)  Thirdly, it removes the risk of creating a theology that seeks to evangelise small children.  Despite the fact that Christian parents might raise their eyebrows at the 'there's no Heaven and Hell', their kids can point to Mello's rosary at the end and say, 'but he did pray!'  Then it's all ok again.

I've seriously waffled here.   Sorry.  But one final point is that Ryuk does differentiate between humans who have touched the Death Note and those who haven't.  While the rules state that all humans go to Mu, he does prefix his statement on the subject by singling out those who were Kira.  What happens to them?  Pure speculation, but I reckon that they become shinigamis.  They've got the work experience, after all. *smirk*



These clubs have permission to use my st00f:

:iconmattgasm: :iconmatts-army: :iconmello-x-matt: :iconmello-always-lives: :icondn-matt-loversclub: :icondeathnoteyaoiclub: :iconinmemoriummxm: :iconseme-mello:
  • Mood: Exhilarated
  • Listening to: Panic at the Disco
  • Reading: Heardred's Hill by Joan Allen
  • Watching: Heroes Season 3
  • Playing: CubeGame - Platinum on all levels pl0x
  • Eating: .. *looks around* I'm smoking a fag
  • Drinking: Tea
Add a Comment:
 
:iconphoenyxangel:
PhoenyxAngel Featured By Owner May 30, 2012
Very, very interesting. But I'm not really sure I understand your idea of MU from a Wiccan standpoint. Could you clarify what you mean by that? I saw you mention it a few times, but from what I read you seem to go with the more atheistic view that MU means cease to exist. I studied Wicca for about 10 years, on and off, so I'm interested in what your view of MU to mean.

I, personally, like the view MU as the afterlife of nothingness. Everyone goes there, so everyone is still equal in death. I just don't like the idea of my favorite characters ceasing to exist. lol. XD
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008  Student
Ohba,from an interview:"I did not put much deep thought into subjects like "life and death" or "justice and evil"."
.....
........
.........................:iconyagamirapefaceplz:
....No,this just make me SAD.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
Mmmm... It's hard to know what (s)he did or didn't do. If (s)he spent as much time developing plotlines as smudging over the weak points, we'd have an even more amazing manga to pour over. :p
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2008  Student
OH YOU'RE SO RIGHT!!! :faint:
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008  Student
I would have liked to see in the very last last panel Ryuk taking Kira to hell saying"surprize!!!"...yep,i would have find it very funny...and we would have seen one of those wonderful Kirafaces...:iconhappylightplz:
Yep,perhaps Ryuk could have really cheated Raito for once,he never really said that H and H does not exist,:XD:...even if we know that the author made it like this for young audience(OMG)and in fact,at the last pages of DN what I feel is exactly:NOTHING -_-
Argh.It made me angry that we make all those wonderful speculations then we hear that there are some marketing tricks on the back,nothing more... -_-
like the: "ohemgee I made Mello TOO MUCH wonderful,let's kill him YAYYYY".............
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
I hear you and agree with every word. :D
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2008  Student
aww :hug: finally I can reply to you TvT
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2008
Indeed, though if you come to MangaBullet, we'll probably have a more permanent communication. :D
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2008  Student
Orz...Yes I see,a great part of the MxM fandom is already here...:P
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2008
:nod:
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2008  Student
And I understand-WHY- :XD:
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:iconekiaku:
EkiAku Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2008
This is awesome, haven't read it all yet. A lot to digest, just a little thing that irks me, Ohba is female. Her first name is Tsugumi. I believe that is a very feminine name.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
A couple of people have said that and I would have agreed before writing this. If you look through the comments, I responded to Spoiled-kitten with my reasoning here.
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:iconekiaku:
EkiAku Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
Ah, for once I didn't. Sorry bout that, little tired that day XD Must not comment when tired....
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:iconsvadilfari-sm:
Svadilfari-sm Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008
"In short, we'd never see L returning, like Banquo's ghost, to accuse Raito of being Kira."

*sniffs* I wasn't that ambitious, I just kept waiting patiently for some several chapters for Naomi to make a reappearence coz there was just NO way she could have died so fast.

I'm pretty neutral about this. Having a Heaven and Hell I believe for canon DN would have simplified matters I believe because there is the danger of falling into a binary construction of opposites. Boo to unequivocal ends I say!

Plus, my mind has a tendencey to slide into nihilistic thought when I'm not looking.

However, while Christian parents may be mollified (and here I'm not sure how many would be there are a lot of anti-Catholic Christians about too. I'm not sure about rosaries but Mother Mary is a great source of contention) I don't think those of other faiths would be. A rosary? So what? Madonna wears it for fashion.

But! If you want my opinion on what would have happened to the sex on legs M&M's (if they HAD died which we clearly now know did NOT) then I this is what would have happened: a couple of Valkyries would have swooped down and picked up Matt and (to his everlasting horror and blasphemy) Mello to Valhalla. Yes, I'm dead serious and no, it's too early in the morning for me to be smoking funny stuff.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
I read about Naomi in DN13 yesterday. She was an early victim of Mello Syndrome - killed off because she learned too much, too quickly and the story would have been over too soon.

Unequivocal works for me too. 8D And yay for a nihilistic mind!

Oh yes! I love that image! Brunhilde pulling them up onto the back of her horse! :dance: Perfect! They did deserve Valhalla.
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:iconekiaku:
EkiAku Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2008
LOL MELLO SYNDROME! PERFECT! Seriously, a perfect explaination.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
*grin*

It's the condition whereby Ohba realises there's too strong a character, so kills them off or fades them out just to keep the story going, instead of coming out with something feasible.

For example, Mello learned too much too soon. Fine.

Ohba's solution: Have him follow the gang to Japan, then disappear.

Matilda's solution: Have him floored for a while because of the serious injuries he incurred during the explosion.

It's not rocket science...
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:iconekiaku:
EkiAku Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
She never really did Mello enough love. Poor Mello! :crying:

Matilda = Miyamashi?
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
No, we're two different people. However, I'm (2nd) Matty to her Mello. :p
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:iconekiaku:
EkiAku Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
Ohhh that's your real name then? XDD I have no idea. Go easy on me, I'm a little oblivious sometimes XD
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2008
LOL No, Miyamashi and I are different people. :p
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(1 Reply)
:iconsaphira112:
Saphira112 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008   Writer
This actually makes a lot of sense. I like it XD
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
Thank you very much. 8D
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:iconcalawyn:
Calawyn Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008
You sure do think a lot, don't you? :) I enjoyed your analysis; I always found those big words at the end of the manga "After they die, the place they go is MU" pretty unsettling, so I feel a bit better thinking that first, Ohba is trying to be impartial (in a sense) and second, 'mu' is a word that doesn't really translate well. Always nice to hear your thoughts.

Also, I agree with Spoiled-Kitten - I usually think of Ohba as a female (although we don't really know, since apparently it's a pen name and she's really secretive).
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
I suspect that Mu is a word that doesn't translate well. I think that I understand more what it isn't than what it is.

I'll respond to the Ohba gender question in response to *Spoiled-kitten.
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:iconcalawyn:
Calawyn Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
Hm, I was not aware that Tsugumi was a female name. That undermines one of my thoughts as to why the author is probably female. The remarks about female intelligence don't, though, I don't think. *muses*
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2008
You thought that it was a female taking a male name in order to survive the world of manga?
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:iconcalawyn:
Calawyn Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2008
Well, that's the tradition, on this side of the world, at least. Women using male pseudonyms or going by their initials. You use a male name, immediately get more respect. This was very true in the past, and I actually still think that it's a good idea now; I know that I usually go by my initials when I write or draw. I figured that, since Death Note was pubished by Shonen Jump, the author would need a male or neutral name to appeal to the target audience. Sort of the same tactic as J.K. Rowling, who is used her initials so that she wouldn't lose boys as an audience for her work.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
Yes, it is a bit weird that someone taking a pseudonym in a male-dominated environment would choose a female name.

Mind you, he comes across as so dismissive of women, I wonder if he was trying to avoid theological depth by pretending to be a woman. Pure malicious speculation there, of course!
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:iconcalawyn:
Calawyn Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
Well, three thoughts there. First, it's the character who is a misogynist, right? The views of the characters aren't necessarily those of the author. I mean, I know that probably the quickest way to get my audience to dislike a character is to make them a blatent racist. Those aren't my views, though. It's just a tactic that works in modern society.

Second, it doesn't make sense to me for a Japanese author to use a female name in order to get away with making negative comments about women, because I don't think that the Japanese view sexism and racism the same way that Western culture does. I mean, when I was there, a bunch of middle school kid pointed at me and my friends and said "Gaijin-san!" (foreigners!). That's perfectly okay over there. Also, apparently, you can get away with stuff with the Japanese police if you happen to be female and you look scared (bonus points if you're a pretty foreigner, as it turns out). ^^; It's not taboo there, I don't think, to be a little sexist.

And third, of course - unfortunately, there are plenty of female misogynists. My great aunt was one. It always startles me to meet one, but they exist.
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:iconbadbadtzmaru:
badbadtzmaru Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008  Student
Heheh.I like malicious speculations here...
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:iconmad-hatters-hare:
Mad-Hatters-Hare Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008  Student Digital Artist
You do the best research ever, if I may.

And also:

In short, we'd never see L returning, like Banquo's ghost, to accuse Raito of being Kira.

I *really* liked that reference! :nod:
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
I thank you. *bows*

Cool! Another MacBeth fan!
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:iconmad-hatters-hare:
Mad-Hatters-Hare Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008  Student Digital Artist
I love MacBeth! Read it last year for English class, and just adored it.
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:iconspoiled-kitten:
Spoiled-kitten Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008
Well, you're right about shinigamis, they're not part of any japanese religion, they were imported from Europe during 19th century and now they're more like a mitological being than a religious thing.

But I disagree about the oriental view you say Ohba (i thought Ohba was a woman, but i may be totally wrong here) wanted to give to the story, or that it was thought foor oriental people. It was more likely planned to be popular just in Japan, but many animes take inspiratin from Western religion or tradition, and they often make a weird mix of this and that LOL Also, there' s a fraction of Japan population wich is Chistian.

Damn. I can't remember what I meant to tell! >.< I think i need a nap LOL
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
But don't you think that Ohba moved away from Western thought when (s)he was so adamant that Mu was nothingness?

As for gender, I alway thought that Ohba was female too. Earlier journals have me saying 'she' rather than 'he'. However, I was reading through one of the mangas in the week and got annoyed again at the subtle (and not so subtle) sexism. It was the bit where Takada gets chosen as spokesperson for Kira. Raito says that she's smart, but as a woman cannot compete with his genius, or crap to that effect. Whatever the wording, it was clear that Takada fails, not because she's the evil bitch who got Mello and Matt killed, but because she's a mere weak woman.

I got to thinking about the portrayal of women in Death Note and finally decided that no woman would be so dismissive. At least, I like to think so. So I went on a google search. I found out that Ohba strictly guards the secret of his/her gender, but that Tsugumi is a female name. I also learned that an early scanlation team arbitrarily assigned her gender as female, and that's why everyone is so convinced that she is a she.

Then I plunged further. I found a news story where the male writer of Death Note had been arrested for speeding and had been found to have a katana in his boot. He was, at the time of the report, banged up in a police cell accordingly. Then I found several references to fans believing that Tsugumi Ohba is the pseudonym of a male Japanese writer named Hiroshi Gamou. Here's one source for that: [link]
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:iconspoiled-kitten:
Spoiled-kitten Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
Well, I find Mu and "nothingness" veryclode to what I believe we find after death: nothing. I don't think it's Western or Oriental, it's just a more poetic way to say that after death you're nothing., you just stop existing. Well, of course this is what I understood reading it through the galss of my Atheism, but I guess it may be interpreted in different ways for different faiths...

About the gender of obha, dunno. Japan is a pretty sexist country, and often women are so sexist as men... But yeah, girls in DN are not the best characters. Soem people defend Takada as the more intelligent girl in DN, but I disagree. She even more stupid than Misa, in my opinion.
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2008
That's my Mu, in the context of Death Note, does work. You can read it within your Aethism, I can read it within my Wicca, someone else could read it within Christianity, and we're all happy.

I agree with you re Takada. Misa is a weird one. She's annoying as Hell, but does start off reasonably intelligent (she tracks down Kira, when even L couldn't manage it) then gets progressively more stupid as the story goes on.
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:iconcatmoongirl23:
catmoongirl23 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2008   Writer
Ah! Yes! I was waiting for you to start thinking about Mu! Not to say you hadn't, but I did my research about halfway through writing Beyond so...yeah, it's been awhile. lol
Yeah, I came to a lot of the same conclusions as you about Mu, but I left them out of the epilogue of Beyond so as not to bog the story down with useless info. I wanted a dramatic ending. Best way to do that? Keep it short and sweet.
Yeah, Mu gets a bit complex when you get really deep into it (though I might just be the one that thinks its complex and I'm sure I don't need to tell you anything like that lol) , but I think the essential thing to remember is that if you wanna really take Mu factually, it isn't actually nothingness. If you wanna take it in the Death Note canon, then yes, it is. Makes the story that much darker, less philisophical. And after all, isn't that what the shows creators were going for? Less debate about right and wrong and more fun.

L coming back like Banquo?! What great fun that would be! *squeal* Sorry, I have a real thing for Macbeth. Ah, high school...

The only kind of "otherworld" that I inferred was this:
There is a world of Shinigamis. Only shinigami are allowed to reside there and...well, at this point I'm not sure what the population of shinigami are, but I'm gonna say for now that at the current time, none are being born or dying. Perhaps some are, but as Ryuk has said, the use of them is fading, so perhaps some of them disappearing is just keeping the balance.
There are other worlds besides the human world, hence why Ryuk watched the human world from a giant orb/ball/ruin, whatever. There are many other ball like things in the shinigami realm, all possibly possessing other worlds. However, residents of each world cannot cross over to each one. The only thing that can travel between would be shinigami, since their world is what possesses each one.
There is no afterlife, though I sort of cheated on this one. I'm still debating about the afterlife I painted for Matt and Mello in my bonus chapter. Hell, I'm still debating about my own religious beliefs at the moment, so I decided on the same thing a little while ago. I'll just stop asking.
However, that doesn't make for very entertaining bonus chapters, so I just write what the readers what. Hence, a thank you. However, I could just as easily write about them in a desolate place of nothingness, though how you can write about nothingness becomes a bit of a paradox.

I'm rambling now, so I'm gonna just leave it at that. Very insightful entry. I love seeing your mind at work. lol
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:iconmrsjeevas:
MrsJeevas Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2008
Thank you for your additional insight! I still believe that you've cornered the genre for posthumous MxM stories. ;D
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October 30, 2008
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